Voting

2017-2018 | Important Dates | Candidates | Allegations | NominationsVoting

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Curious to learn more about how the voting process works for your Feds Elections? Check out the short and detailed explanations below:

Short Version

Exec Elections
The ballot for the Executive Election will be a ranked ballot. What this means is that you can rank as many candidates as you want in the order that you would like them to receive your vote. In the case that your candidate was to receive the lowest number of votes, and be eliminated, your vote would then be given to the candidate you ranked second. This would continue until one candidate gets more than 50% of the vote.

Council Elections
The ballot for the Council Election will be a ranked ballot. What this means is that you can rank as many candidates as you want in the order that you would like them to receive your vote. If a candidate receives more votes than they need to win those votes will be proportionally redistributed according to the second choice of their voters. If there are still open seats, the candidate with the lowest number of votes will be eliminated and their votes will also be allocated according to the second choice of the voters. This will continue until all the seats are filled.

Senate Election and Referendum
For both of these elections you will be able to vote for one candidate or for Yes or No in the case of the referendum. The winner will be the candidate or choice with the most votes.

 

Detailed Explanation

Exec Election
This year, instead of just voting for one person per executive position, you will be able to rank the candidates when you vote.

Under the new voting system, candidates need to get 50% +1 of the vote. In order to accomplish this we have a system of Instant Runoff Voting. What this means is that if a candidate does not reach the 50% +1 threshold on the first vote the candidate with the lowest number of votes is eliminated and their votes are redistributed. This is where the ranked ballot comes in. We look at the second choice for voters of the eliminated candidate and redistribute their votes accordingly. This is done until there is a winner.

Example:
There are 33 votes. In order to win a candidate needs to get 17 votes.

First Round:
Candidate A – 13
Candidate B – 7
Candidate C – 6
Candidate D – 7

Candidate C has the lowest number of votes and is eliminated. Their votes are redistributed according to the 2nd choice indicated by the voter. Candidate D and Candidate A both get 3 votes.

Second Round:
Candidate A – 16
Candidate B – 7
Candidate D – 10

We now eliminate Candidate B. Their votes are also redistributed, in this case Candidate A gets 0 votes and Candidate D gets 17.

Third Round:
Candidate A – 16
Candidate D – 17
Candidate D is the winner.

In our voting system your ballot will allow you to click and drag to rank the candidates from top to bottom.

Council Election
Council voting is a little different from the Executive voting system because there will be multiple winner. You vote the same way as the Exec ballot, but it is redistributed differently. To establish how many votes are needed for a candidate to win we divide the number of votes by the number of seats plus one and then add one to it. In this system votes are redistributed first from any candidates that reach the winning threshold. We take their excess votes, the votes above what they needed to win, and redistribute them to the remaining candidates as a percentage of the total second ballot preference from the people that voted for the winner. We also eliminate the person with the lowest votes and redistribute those second choice votes.

Example:
There are 33 votes and two open positions. This means you need 12 votes to win

First Round:
Candidate A – 13
Candidate B – 7
Candidate C – 7
Candidate D – 6

Candidate A reaches the threshold and is declared elected.  We then take their one vote and redistribute it based on the second ballot choices of Candidate A’s voters. Candidate B received 6 second choice votes and Candidate C 7. To calculate how much they get we divide 1/13 and then multiply their votes by this number. This means Candidate B will get 0.46 of a vote and Candidate C 0.54

Second Round:
Candidate A – 12 Elected
Candidate B – 7.46
Candidate C – 7.54
Candidate D – 6

Since after redistributing the excess votes of Candidate A we do not have a winner, we eliminate Candidate D. Candidate C’s second choice votes are divided 5 to candidate C and 1 to Candidate B.

Third Round:
Candidate A – 12 Elected
Candidate B – 12.46 Elected
Candidate C – 8.54
Candidate B is now declared elected.

We now have both of our positions filled by candidate A and B.

In our voting system your ballot will allow you to click and drag to rank the candidates from top to bottom.

Senate Election and Referendum
The Senate Election is a first past the post-election. You get to vote for one candidate and the candidate with a plurality wins.

The Referendum is also a first past the post-election. You get to vote Yes or No and the choice with a plurality wins.